Bottled Water: Is the Tide Turning for a Top Seller? Can you remember a time before bottled water? It wasn't long ago, but we fast became aquaphiles; it's now the nation's second largest beverage category. Is a landmark restaurant's decision to stop selling it a sign of a crack in the dike?
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Bottled Water: Is the Tide Turning for a Top Seller?

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Bottled Water: Is the Tide Turning for a Top Seller?

Bottled Water: Is the Tide Turning for a Top Seller?

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

The United States is fast-becoming a nation of aquaphiles(ph). Bottled water is now the second largest beverage category in this country, just behind carbonated soft drinks. Although the trend seems likely to continue, WEEKEND EDITION food commentator, Bonny Wolf see signs it maybe slowing to a trickle.

BONNY WOLF: Effect? Look around you. Now, Chez Panisse follows a handful of other restaurants in giving up the bottle. They, and others, have qualms about how much energy it takes to get water from Italy to California dinner tables. Other concerned citizens are upset about the huge number of water bottles not being recycled.

C: So is the tide turning? Will we see a water war? For now, the public demand shows no sign of drying up.

HANSEN: Bonny Wolf is the author of "Talking With My Mouth Full" and contributing editor for "Kitchen Window," NPR's online food column. Recipes for her potato chip cookies can be found at npr.org.

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HANSEN: This is NPR News.

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