Taking Darwin Personally Why do Charles Darwin's ideas generate such strong resistance? Maybe because it hurts people's feelings. But does accepting our place in the animal kingdom make us any less miraculous?
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Taking Darwin Personally

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Taking Darwin Personally

Taking Darwin Personally

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Diane Roberts offers this essay on why Charles Darwin's ideas generate such strong resistance.

DIANE ROBERTS: But does accepting our place in the animal kingdom make us any less miraculous? The human brain evolved to remember the past. We can imagine the future. We can make worlds with our heads and our hands. We can delight in the stars of the night sky and know that we are made of the same stuff as they are. We are part of nature. We lose nothing by admitting it.

HANSEN: Essayist Diane Roberts lives in Tallahassee, Florida.

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