MLB Officials Can't Ignore Bonds, Can They? San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds is edging closer to Henry Aaron's career home-run record. That poses a delicate problem for baseball officials, who might be expected to be on hand to witness the achievement.
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MLB Officials Can't Ignore Bonds, Can They?

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MLB Officials Can't Ignore Bonds, Can They?

MLB Officials Can't Ignore Bonds, Can They?

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Barry Bonds stands just 11 homeruns away from breaking the career record set by Henry Aaron, and that poses a problem for Major League Baseball. So commentator Frank Deford is offering a solution.

FRANK DEFORD: So we will simply close our eyes when he takes the record away from the admirable and esteemed Henry Aaron and celebrate other finer things that make us happy. Come to my party, Mr. Selig. Hey, commish, have another mojito. And you, counselor Fehr, put on that lampshade again and do another break-dance.

INSKEEP: Start rooting for Alex Rodriguez to hit more homeruns. He's only 31 years old now and already has almost 500 homers. With luck, A-Rod can eclipse Bonds' record sometime during the second administration of Barack Obama.

DEFORD: If you can't say something nice about someone, don't say anything at all.

INSKEEP: You hear him on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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