Hamas, Fatah Clash in Gaza; Israel Strikes by Air Gaza saw a fourth day of intense fighting between the military wing of Hamas and forces loyal to Hamas's rival, Fatah. Then, yet another cease-fire was announced. The latest truce declaration came after a bloody day that left at least 15 Palestinians dead and dozens of others wounded.
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Hamas, Fatah Clash in Gaza; Israel Strikes by Air

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Hamas, Fatah Clash in Gaza; Israel Strikes by Air

Hamas, Fatah Clash in Gaza; Israel Strikes by Air

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

NPR's Linda Gradstein reports from Jerusalem.

LINDA GRADSTEIN: Unidentified Man: There is no differentiation between armed men and an innocent baby walking in the streets. The masked men are shooting at everything moving in the streets, even cats and dogs.

GRADSTEIN: The signing has imperiled the unity government between Fatah and Hamas formed in February after a similar wave of factional violence earlier in the year. Palestinian Information Minister Mustafa Barghouti speaking before today's truce was announced, said the fighting is a challenge to the future of Palestinian democracy.

MUSTAFA BARGHOUTI: They keep making agreements and then they violate it within minutes. We told both sides since they are in the government that they - we should talk to the president; the president control their people. When we formed the national unity government, it was formed specifically to prevent internal fighting and to open the road of protecting democracy.

GRADSTEIN: Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert today said the time of restraint has ended, and Israel will respond harshly to the rocket attacks. At the same time, Israeli officials say they believe Hamas is trying to divert attention from the internal fighting by dragging Israel into the conflict. Government spokeswoman Miri Eisin says Israel won't let that happen.

MIRI EISIN: We will respond but we won't be dragged by Hamas, by a terrorist organization. We are not going to do this on their terms and at their time.

GRADSTEIN: Linda Gradstein, NPR News, Jerusalem.

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