Spring Unleashes Inner Mr(s). Clean Commentator Laura Lorson says there's just something about the creeping of temperatures into the mid-60s that sets off a strange chain reaction in her. The gene for spring cleaning that she is confident resides only on the X chromosome is somehow activated. Can she refinish the kitchen cabinets? Yes she Can! Can she drag herself away from reruns of NCIS to repot the houseplants? Yes she can!
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Spring Unleashes Inner Mr(s). Clean

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Spring Unleashes Inner Mr(s). Clean

Spring Unleashes Inner Mr(s). Clean

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

The poet T.S. Eliot said that April is the cruelest month. For commentator Laura Lorson, though, April is the cleanest, and she's stealing herself for the task.

LAURA LORSON: There's just something about the creeping of temperatures into the mid-60s and the desire to throw open the windows for a change, that sets off a chain reaction in me. All of a sudden, the curtains somehow look gray. The floors need refinishing. The dust, which has lived happily under the bed all winter is suddenly an outrage, not to be endured for one more minute.

What looked impossible, Sisyphean and pointless in January suddenly seems possible. It's like President Obama showed up, elbowing aside the lazier angels of my nature. Can I refinish the kitchen cabinets? Yes, I can. Can I steam-clean the carpets? Yes I can. Can I drag myself away from reruns of NCIS to repot all the houseplants? Yes I can.

I get home from work and I notice that the kitchen floor is a disaster area. Behold, this mild-mannered homemaker who has no compunctions about employing the five-second food-on-the-floor rule, even if it means eating a bit of dog hair, turns into Mopgirl. With her trusty sidekick, Broomdog.

My husband hardly knows what to think. One day, he leaves the companionably cluttered, reassuringly dusty house. He returns that night to discover he is expected to use coasters and he can bounce a quarter off the freshly sunned, hospital-cornered bed. He and the dogs meekly tiptoe around for a week, unsure if it's okay to walk on the carpets yet, afraid to be fingered as the cause of the eventual entropy that will set in around mid-June. Which, of course, it will. As it gets hotter, in high summer, I just lose the will to dust.

When the daily high temperature drops back to the mid-60s again in October, it will be time for Housecleaning, Part 2: This Time, It's Personal.

BLOCK: Commentator Laura Lorson can't hear you because she's vacuuming her house in Perry, Kansas. There's more commentary and you can weigh in, too, at our Opinion Page that's at npr.org.

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