Headlines: Diabetes Drug , 'Little Rock Nine' Coin Farai Chideya scans the day's headlines for news affecting black life and culture. Tuesday's headlines include a new study suggesting that the diabetes drug Avandia increases the risk of heart attack, and a new coin from the U.S. Mint commemorates the Little Rock Nine, the historic group of black students who tried to integrate Central High in Little Rock, Ark., in 1957.
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Headlines: Diabetes Drug , 'Little Rock Nine' Coin

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Headlines: Diabetes Drug , 'Little Rock Nine' Coin

Headlines: Diabetes Drug , 'Little Rock Nine' Coin

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FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

From NPR News, this is NEWS & NOTES. I'm Farai Chideya.

Coming up, we have a really complicated, fascinating story of an American Muslim held in an Ethiopian prison. We've also got a great visit with Lucille Clifton, a poet who talks to us about being a writer, a mother and a teacher.

But first, let's kick things off with headlines. Today, we start with your neighborhood pharmacy. A new study found that the use of a popular diabetes drug, Avandia, may increase the risk of heart attack. This is from the New England Journal of Medicine. The Food and Drug Administration issued a public safety alert. It advised patients to check with their doctors. The company that makes Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline, disputes the study's findings, but it also acknowledged that it knew of possible heart risks as early as last August and notified the FDA. Avandia treats type 2 diabetes. African-Americans are nearly twice as likely to get diabetes as white Americans.

And now, on to Little Rock, Arkansas. This September marks the 50th anniversary of the Little Rock Nine. They are the nine black students who braved an angry mob to integrate Little Rock Central High. And to mark the occasion, the U.S. Mint has a new Little Rock Nine coin. The silver dollar shows a soldier escorting the students on one side, on the other, a view of Central High School from 1957. The Mint showed off the coin at the NAACP's recent Daisy Bates Education Summit.

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