Put The Meaning In Reverse For each sentence given, change just one letter in one word to reverse the sentence's meaning. For example, given "The guard will not let you through the gate," you would change the T in "not" to a W for, "The guard will now let you through the gate."
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Put The Meaning In Reverse

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Put The Meaning In Reverse

Put The Meaning In Reverse

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LYNN NEARY, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Lynn Neary sitting in for Liane Hansen. And joining us now is puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Hi, Will. Good to talk to you again.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Lynn. Welcome back.

NEARY: Will, tell me, what's new in puzzle land? What's happening since I've -last I've spoken with you?

SHORTZ: Oh, so much. But this weekend I'm going to be in Zilina, Slovakia for the 4th World Sudoku Championship. An American, Thomas Snyder, is the reigning world champion, and the U.S. champion from last fall, Wei-Hwa Huang, is also on the team. So we're hoping for the best. I'll give you a report next week.

NEARY: Sounds really exciting. So tell us now, if you could, repeat the challenge that you left us with last week.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the phrase more corruptness, rearrange these 15 letters to name a popular magazine. And I said it's a magazine this phrase definitely does not apply to. It's more an anti-gram than an anagram. What is it?

NEARY: And the answer is?

SHORTZ: The answer is Consumer Reports.

NEARY: And I'm sorry to say I did not come up with that answer. But we did receive about 2500 correct entries to the challenge. And our randomly selected winner is Joy Kipp from Burlington, Vermont. She joins us now.

Hi, Joy.

Ms. JOY KIPP: Hello, there.

NEARY: Well, you live in one of my favorite cities. I love Burlington.

Ms. KIPP: Yes, it's a beautiful place.

NEARY: What do you do there?

Ms. KIPP: I am an art teacher at a middle school in Burlington. And I am an aspiring writer.

NEARY: Oh, that's great. How long have you been playing the puzzle?

Ms. KIPP: Oh, postcard days.

NEARY: Oh.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. KIPP: I've been waiting. I, you know, I really hope someday to maybe get a Pulitzer or a Tony, but the thing I most covet is an NPR WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin. So this is everything. I think I need to get a life.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NEARY: Oh, that's great. Good luck with the Pulitzers and the Tonys, too.

Ms. KIPP: Thank you so much.

NEARY: So, are you ready to play?

Ms. KIPP: I am very ready.

NEARY: Excellent. Will, meet Joy, and let's play.

SHORTZ: All right, Joy. Well, first of all, I want to say listeners the challenge puzzle coming up requires a little writing. So if you want to try it you should have pencil and paper handy.

Now, Joy and Lynn, I'm going to read you some sentences. For each sentence, change one letter in just one word to completely reverse the sentence's meaning.

Ms. KIPP: Oh.

SHORTZ: For example, if I said, the guard will not let you through the gate, you would change the T of not to a W to make it, the guard will now let you through the gate.

Ms. KIPP: Okay.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: Here's number one, given the choice of gloves, I prefer these.

Ms. KIPP: Given the choice of cloves, I…

NEARY: Hmm.

Ms. KIPP: Oh, Lynn, are you there?

NEARY: I'm thinking. I'm thinking.

Ms. KIPP: It could be, I prefer those.

SHORTZ: Well, instead of - I prefer those. Yes. Change the E to an O. That's all.

Ms. KIPP: Oh, that was too easy, okay.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: That was too easy. They do get harder.

Ms. KIPP: Good.

SHORTZ: Here's your next one. The pastor followed a liberal interpretation of the Bible. The pastor followed a liberal interpretation of the Bible.

Ms. KIPP: A literal.

SHORTZ: Literal is right.

NEARY: Oh, that's good.

SHORTZ: After getting a new card, the poker player decided to hold.

Ms. KIPP: After getting a new car.

SHORTZ: Card. Card with a D.

Ms. KIPP: Card. Oh, card.

SHORTZ: The poker player decided to hold.

Ms. KIPP: Fold.

SHORTZ: Fold is right. The race started a mile away and our car came in fast.

Ms. KIPP: Last.

SHORTZ: That's fast.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: The ocean cruise was everything I'd dreamed. The ocean cruise was everything I'd dreamed.

Ms. KIPP: I'd - Lynn, you there?

NEARY: I have an idea. I have an idea. Dreaded?

SHORTZ: Dreaded. Good job. Everything I dreaded.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. KIPP: Thank you.

SHORTZ: Try this one. I get scared when it's light.

Ms. KIPP: Night.

SHORTZ: Night. Good. With any luck the investors will spur on the deal.

NEARY: Well, hmm.

SHORTZ: With any luck the investors will spur on the deal.

Ms. KIPP: I was going to say with any bucks. But that won't work. The investors will spur on.

NEARY: Spur on. Spur.

SHORTZ: Well, yeah, that's the word, spur.

Ms. KIPP: Yes. That is the word I'm looking at, too. Sour.

SHORTZ: Sour on the deal. Good one.

NEARY: Oh, that's great.

SHORTZ: The commissioner wants to prevent the performance of the rap group. The commissioner wants to prevent the performance of the rap group.

Ms. KIPP: Present.

SHORTZ: Present is it. And here's your last one, the chef wants to cook the turkey for 15 more minutes.

Ms. KIPP: Cool.

SHORTZ: Cool. Oh, that was fast.

Ms. KIPP: Yay.

NEARY: Joy, you're great. You are great.

Ms. KIPP: Thanks. Oh my gosh, this was so much fun.

NEARY: That was a fun puzzle. I enjoyed that one, I have to say.

SHORTZ: Thank you.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. KIPP: Thanks for your help, Lynn.

NEARY: Great job. And, you know, earlier this week it was take our daughters and sons to work day here at NPR. So we now some of those special people to tell you what you have won for playing the puzzle.

Unidentified Children: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get…

Unidentified Child #1: A WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin…

Unidentified Child #2: The 11th Edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Unidentified Child #3: The Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers.

Unidentified Child #1: The "Puzzlemaster Presents" from Random House Volume 2.

Unidentified Child #2: Will Shortz's latest book series, "Will Shortz Presents KenKen," Volumes 1, 2 and 3 from St. Martin's Press.

Unidentified Child #3: And one of the Will Shortz's "Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges" from Chronicle Books.

Ms. KIPP: Oh my gosh.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. KIPP: As a middle school teacher who is on vacation and missing my kids, that was perfect.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NEARY: Oh great. Well, let me tell you that was. That was Amair Ardalon(ph), Kate Larry(ph) and Jonah Thompson(ph). And as I said, these were all kids who were at NPR earlier this week for take our daughters and sons to work day.

Ms. KIPP: That was great, thank you so much.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NEARY: Well, Joy, what's your public radio station?

Ms. KIPP: I listen to VPR, and I am a member.

NEARY: Oh great. Joy Kipp from Burlington, Vermont. Thanks so much for playing the puzzle with us.

Ms. KIPP: Oh, thank you. Have a great time in Slovakia.

NEARY: Well…

SHORTZ: Thanks.

NEARY: So, Will, what's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes all the way from Buenos Aires, Argentina. It's a number puzzle by a very clever puzzlemaker Rudolfo Kurchan. Take these equations, 5 equals 4, 7 equals 5, 8 equals 1 and 26 equals 9. And the question is what does 12 equal? So here it is again, 5 equals 4, 7 equals 5, 8 equals 1 and 26 equals 9. What does 12 equal?

NEARY: All right, Will, I'm totally hopeless at number puzzles.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NEARY: But I'm sure a lot of our listeners can do that. So, when you have the answer, go to our Web site, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Only one entry per person please. And our deadline this week is Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern Time. So please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And we'll call if you're the winner. And you'll get to play puzzle on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will. It was great talking with you.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lynn.

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