Headlines: Louisiana Redistricting, Muslim Poll Farai Chideya scans the day's headlines for news affecting black life and culture. Wednesday's headlines include a move in Louisiana to create a new majority-minority judicial district, and the surprising findings of a new poll of African-American Muslims.
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Headlines: Louisiana Redistricting, Muslim Poll

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Headlines: Louisiana Redistricting, Muslim Poll

Headlines: Louisiana Redistricting, Muslim Poll

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FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

From NPR News, this is NEWS & NOTES. I'm Farai Chideya.

Coming up, we have sex and sexuality on HBCU campuses, that's historically black colleges and universities. Also we go take a drive down "Bible Road" with photographer Sam Fentress. But first, let's kick things off with headlines.

Today, we start with Louisiana. The legislature there is struggling with an age-old problem. Black residents want more black judges in their district courts. But because the elections for judges are district-wide, black candidates rarely get elected.

So the state house passed a bill that would create a majority minority judicial district. That would mean at least one African-American judge would likely get elected in a district that's only had white judges up to this point. So there's just one problem with the new subdistrict. It would be too small to be considered representative by constitutional standards. Looks like it's time to go back to the drawing board. Still, majority-minority subdistricts are nothing new to Louisiana. Similar efforts are up and running in Jefferson and East Baton Rouge parishes.

And in national news, the Pew Research Center just released a poll of American Muslims. Three quarters said the use of suicide bombings is never justified. But the most surprising news came from African-American Muslims. Native-born blacks make up one-in-five American Muslims. They're also far more likely than immigrant Muslims to say they support al-Qaida. Only a third had a very unfavorable view of the group. Nearly twice as many immigrant Muslims felt that way.

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