Radio Offers Attractive Space For Ads Radio offers advertisers the last captive audience. Radio ads are cheap to produce and buy airtime for. You can blanket the airwaves with a slogan or jingle in a way you can't anymore with TV.
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Radio Offers Attractive Space For Ads

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Radio Offers Attractive Space For Ads

Radio Offers Attractive Space For Ads

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

For people looking to buy cheaper advertising in any business, not just cars, the Internet is widely considered the place to go. But Warren Berger has another suggestion, radio. He's been watching and writing about the ad industry for 20 years. Last year for the first time, companies spent more on Internet ads than radio ads. Still, Berger argues radio ads are a good deal.

Mr. WARREN BERGER (Journalist; Author, "Advertising Today"): It's funny to me how radio advertising really hasn't changed that much. It's a great vehicle for local marketers because you can just sort of establish yourself as a local presence on the radio.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #1: (Singing) Come on in to Tiffany's Backyard Barbeque…

Mr. BERGER: The rates are affordable. You can go in there and advertise a lot and repeat your message, you know, a lot.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #2: (Singing) …a real man, Grady's(ph) got your truck.

Mr. BERGER: You know, the thing about radio is that you don't need to be paying full attention.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #2: (Singing) Grady's got your truck.

Mr. BERGER: It just kind of gets in your brain and kind of works its way in there through repetition.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #3: Bud Light presents real men of genius.

Unidentified Man #4: (Singing) Real men of genius.

Unidentified Man #3: Today we salute you, mister cargo pants designer.

Mr. BERGER: And there are good ones that do emerge.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #3: Is that a banana in your pocket? Yes. And an orange, and a pocket comb, and an extra set of keys and my sunglasses.

Unidentified Man #4: (Singing) Totally prepared now.

Mr. BERGER: There are some people that manage to do some very clever stuff.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Man #4: (Singing) Yeah.

Unidentified Man #3: So crack open an ice cold Bud Light, oh, prince of the pockets. Some may fill your shoes, but no one can fill your pants.

Mr. BERGER: If you remember years ago you used to hear the same commercials over and over again, and you'd hear the same slogans and jingles.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Woman: (Singing) As long as there is thirst there's always the real thing.

Mr. BERGER: And it would get sort of drummed into your head. That doesn't happen so much on TV anymore because of the splintered television audience, but it still happens on radio.

(Soundbite of radio commercial)

Unidentified Woman: (Singing) Always Coca-Cola.

Mr. BERGER: Radio, you can still get in there and hit someone 20 times a day with your message. And that, believe me, that really gets into their heads.

NORRIS: Warren Berger's forthcoming book is called "Glimmer: How Design Can Transform Your Life and Maybe Even the World."

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