Letters: A Correction, Shakespeare In Tuesday's letters, a correction to a mixup in a recent music montage. Also, the story on "Speak like Shakespeare Day in Chicago" spoketh to many who responded in verse. Michele Norris and Robert Siegel read from listeners' comments.
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Letters: A Correction, Shakespeare

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Letters: A Correction, Shakespeare

Letters: A Correction, Shakespeare

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Now, your letters. And we begin with a correction. Yesterday we aired a story on General Motors in its heyday. The piece featured a montage of GM-inspired songs. And in that montage, we included this…

(Soundbite of song, "Little Deuce Coupe")

The Beach Boys (Musicians): (Singing) Little deuce coupe, you don't know what I got…

NORRIS: That of course is "Little Deuce Coupe" by The Beach Boys. But as many of you pointed out, it had no business in a General Motors montage. Bud Johnson(ph) of Ithaca, New York writes, "Little Deuce Coupe" refers to a 1932 Ford V8 roadster, not a GM product. Nice try anyway. And Mr. Johnson continues, clearly The Beach Boys had the ALL THINGS CONSIDERED staff in mind when they wrote, it's my little deuce coupe, you don't know what I've got.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIEGEL: Our coverage of last week's Senate Armed Services Committee report on the use of harsh interrogation techniques elicited many responses. Most of them were critical of the Bush administration and its interrogation policies. Some of you also took issue with our choice of words.

Sara Howland(ph) of Pensacola, Florida writes, I listened to your show yesterday and waterboarding was consistently referred to as harsh interrogation techniques. Waterboarding is torture and has been classified as torture for many, many years now. And calling it harsh or enhanced interrogation is nothing more than using euphemisms for something that is vile, inhumane and illegal. Call it what it is, please.

NORRIS: Finally, we got lots of mail in response to David Schaper's piece on Chicago's Talk Like Shakespeare Day.

Unidentified Man: I would like to have my beef-witted colleague's support for the barnacle-bladdered board pig ordinance that I have presented today.

NORRIS: Annette Hook(ph) of Lexington, Kentucky, writes, what a fun story. And what a fun idea. It was great listening to the folks from Chicago who participated for your story. With all that is serious in the world, thank you for sharing the fun things in life that make us smile.

SIEGEL: Well, those folks from Chicago imitating the bard also inspired many of you to try the same. Miriam Phillips(ph) of Los Angeles writes, oh, sweet sounds of Shakespeare and syllables of yore that fill the air. Thank you, good folk of NPR. Though news be fresh, it rarely freshening be. Thanks for that fresh air from Windy City.

NORRIS: Well, and thanks to all of you for the verse. Even if iambic pentameter is not your thing, we still want to hear from you. Just go to npr.org and click on Contact Us. And please don't forget to tell us where you're from and how to pronounce you name.

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