Letters: Hispanics, Runpee.com Is being Hispanic newsworthy? Is an interview with the creator of Runpee-dot-com airworthy? These are the questions raised by our listeners. Melissa Block reads their letters.
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Letters: Hispanics, Runpee.com

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Letters: Hispanics, Runpee.com

Letters: Hispanics, Runpee.com

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From Lincoln's letter now to your letters. Many of you have written about our coverage of Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor. Tony VanDyk(ph) of Ardmore, Pennsylvania, had a problem with one part of our coverage, the emphasis on her being Hispanic. He writes: In 2009, are we not more of an integrated society where people should not be judged by their skin color, ethnic heritage or religion but by the content of their character?

He continues: I believe the emphasis should be placed on Judge Sotomayor's exceptional intellect, her judicial prowess and her character with regard to her legal career and not by her being a Hispanic, Catholic woman. Otherwise, I think to be fair, NPR should classify all people they report on by their race, ethnicity and religion.

Thus, when you report on former Vice President Dick Cheney, you should say Dick Cheney, the Methodist 46th white vice president of English, Irish and Welsh ancestry with a bad ticker and a nasty disposition.

On Tuesday, we aired my interview with the creator of the Web site, Runpee.com. The site lists the best times to leave a movie for a bathroom break and still not miss anything critical.

We assume that some of you liked the interview but just didn't write in. Those who did write to us were not amused. MacKenzie Kincaid(ph) of Hindsville, California, says, an entire Web site devoted to optimizing bathroom breaks at the movie theater? Brilliance. I propose that you add a similar feature to your own site so that I'll know when to time my NPR listening breaks. I definitely should have taken one during this story.

Please keep sending us your questions, comments or complaints. We do like to hear from you. You can write to us at npr.org. Click on contact us at the top of the page.

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