Woe Is My Car Industry! Humorist P.J. O'Rourke says that, as a good Republican, he blames everything on feminism and communism. For the demise of the American car, O'Rourke points the finger at feminism — and Facebook.
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Woe Is My Car Industry!

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Woe Is My Car Industry!

Woe Is My Car Industry!

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Humorist and commentator P.J. O'Rourke is also worried about the state of the auto industry. His new book is called "Driving Like Crazy." And now he offers his own theories about where things went wrong.

ROURKE: Our tastes, our interests, our passions are formed in youth. Our passion for the automobile is gone. The car has rolled away to die somewhere because we don't love it anymore. Why fill the tank, check the oil, put air in the tires and drive to hell and gone when heaven is just a mouse-click away?

MONTAGNE: Commentator P.J. O'Rourke's latest book is "Driving Like Crazy." You can hear him on NPR's game show: WAIT, WAIT, DON'T TELL ME, and you can comment on his essay on the opinion section of npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This is NPR News.

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