Listeners, Send In Your Short Stories On Saturday, host Guy Raz and The New Yorker's literary critic, James Wood, introduced NPR's new summer writing contest: Three-Minute Fiction. Listeners are invited to send in original short stories, up to three minutes long. Throughout the summer, Wood will select his favorites and read them on the air.
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Listeners, Send In Your Short Stories

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Listeners, Send In Your Short Stories

Listeners, Send In Your Short Stories

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(Soundbite of timer)

(Soundbite of ding)

GUY RAZ, host:

There's a legend about one of America's greatest writers: Ernest Hemingway. He's in a bar, and someone wagers that Hemingway can write a complete story in just six words. A few minutes later, the author pens this short tale: For sale, baby shoes never worn.

Legend or not, it goes to show that a compelling story can be told in just a few moments. Now it's your turn.

Mr. JAMES WOOD (Literary Critic, The New Yorker): This is James Wood, literary critic at the New Yorker. I'm also your guide to the NPR series Three-Minute Fiction. This summer, lend us your imagination. Send in your original short stories, stories that can be read in three minutes or less. That's about 500 words. We'll pick our favorites to read on the air and post at npr.org.

RAZ: To submit your original work, go to npr.org/threeminutefiction. That's Three-Minute Fiction, all spelled out, no spaces.

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