Hum of the Newspaper Press Soothes Texas Man Listener Gary Borders of Lufkin, Texas, loves the sound of his newspaper press starting up.
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Hum of the Newspaper Press Soothes Texas Man

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Hum of the Newspaper Press Soothes Texas Man

Hum of the Newspaper Press Soothes Texas Man

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  • Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Today's sound clip comes from an industry that's been facing cutbacks lately.

Mr. GARY BORDERS (Newspaper Publisher, Texas): My name is Gary Borders. I'm a newspaper publisher in Lufkin, Texas, a small town of about 35,000 in East Texas. And my sound is the sound of a newspaper press staring up.

(Soundbite of newspaper press starting up)

Mr. BORDERS: The sound I've loved hearing for 38 years or so since starting out as a paperboy when I was 13 years old.

(Soundbite of newspaper press starting up)

Mr. BORDERS: And I'm here to tell you that in small towns across America like Lufkin, Texas, newspapers are alive and well. We're flourishing; we're covering our communities. And I really believe that we'll be here for a long time and that for many years to come I'll be able to enjoy this sound.

NORRIS: Lufkin, Texas newspaperman Gary Borders with the sound clip from his life. Share your with us at npr.org. Search for the word soundclips.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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