Give A Ring, Get A Grin For each clue, the answer is a four-letter word. The word is an anagram of one of the words in the clue. For example, if the clue is "main line through Egypt," the answer would be "Nile," because Nile is a rearrangement of the letters in "line."
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Give A Ring, Get A Grin

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Give A Ring, Get A Grin

Give A Ring, Get A Grin

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Liane Hansen.

And joining us is puzzle master Will Shortz. Hey, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Liane. Welcome back from your travels.

HANSEN: Thank you very much. We had a great time in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and we're going to be telling everybody our stories next week. But meanwhile, you gave us a challenge last week, which did not involve the Periodic Table. Would you tell us what it was?

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Michael Duran from Topsham, Maine. I said take a familiar French word in three letters. I'd say it's a word that everyone knows. Then take its meaning in English, also in three letters. Say these two words one after the other, and phonetically they'll sound like another French word everyone knows. What is it?

HANSEN: What is it?

SHORTZ: Well, the first word is mer, M-E-R. That means sea, S-E-A. Say them together you get merci.

HANSEN: Oh, tres bien. Tres bien.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: Our listeners I guess really know their French One. Or like me, took French One for six years.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: We received about 1,500 entries this week and from the correct entries, our randomly selected winner is Elaine Chapin of Geneva, New York. Hi, Elaine.

Ms. ELAINE CHAPIN: Hi.

HANSEN: How long did it take you to solve the puzzle?

Ms. CHAPIN: It popped into my head in about half an hour.

HANSEN: Really?

Ms. CHAPIN: Yeah.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: Wow. How long have you've been playing?

Ms. CHAPIN: Well, off and on for years, but only in the last three or four months have we've been sending in answers.

HANSEN: We, meaning you and your husband?

Ms. CHAPIN: Yes.

HANSEN: Yeah? And so you're getting confident enough to send them in, right?

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. CHAPIN: Yes.

HANSEN: Do you like puzzles?

Ms. CHAPIN: I love puzzles.

HANSEN: Oh, well are you ready to play this one?

Ms. CHAPIN: Yes.

HANSEN: All right. Look, she is confident.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: So Elaine, meet Will. Will, meet Elaine. Let's play.

Ms. CHAPIN: Hi, Will.

SHORTZ: Hi, Elaine. I'm going to give you some clues. Each answer is a four-letter word. And this word is an anagram of one of the words in the clue. For example, if I gave you the clue, main line through Egypt, you would say Nile, and Nile is a rearrangement of the letters of line.

Ms. CHAPIN: Okay.

SHORTZ: Okay. Number one is group that acts in a play.

Ms. CHAPIN: Cast.

SHORTZ: Cast. Right, being an anagram of acts. Good. Number two is cheese made in Holland.

Ms. CHAPIN: Edam.

SHORTZ: That's correct. Person one likes very much.

Ms. CHAPIN: Chum.

HANSEN: Chum.

SHORTZ: Chum. That's it. Musical tone.

Ms. CHAPIN: Note.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Clothing item worn inside a shoe.

Ms. CHAPIN: Sock?

SHORTZ: No there's no anagram...

Ms. CHAPIN: Hose?

SHORTZ: Hose. That's it. Good. Overrule, as a congressional vote.

Ms. CHAPIN: Veto.

SHORTZ: That's right. Bit of land that lies in the ocean.

Ms. CHAPIN: Isle.

SHORTZ: Good. Vile, V-I-L-E. What word means vile? It's a rearrangement of vile.

Ms. CHAPIN: Evil?

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Evil is it. Good.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: How about ayes, A-Y-E-S? These might be votes in a legislator.

Ms. CHAPIN: Yays.

SHORTZ: Yays and ayes mean the same. Right. Wander over.

Ms. CHAPIN: Rove.

SHORTZ: Rove is it. What freezers do when the electricity is turned off?

Ms. CHAPIN: Thaw?

SHORTZ: Thaw is it, anagram of what. Good. How about drinks for sale at a pub?

Ms. CHAPIN: Ale.

SHORTZ: That's it. Source of money used by clubs.

Ms. CHAPIN: Dues?

SHORTZ: Dues is it. And your last one: last thing added to buttered popcorn.

Ms. CHAPIN: Salt.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: Salt, anagram of last. Good job.

HANSEN: Elaine. Well done. Well done. And you were doing these in your head I bet.

Ms. CHAPIN: Yes.

HANSEN: Yes. Oh, man. Put me to shame. Well, we have a group of specials guests to tell you what you'll get for playing today's puzzle. They wrote a Hip-hop song that's been viewed more than five million times on YouTube, but they're not your everyday rappers. They're scientists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. And the rap is about the Large Hadron Collider. Now here's the rap.

CERN RAPPERS: (Rapping) Two beams of protons swing round, through the ring they ride 'til in the hearts of the detectors, they're made to collide. And all that energy packed in such a tiny bit of room becomes mass, particles created from the vacuum. And then...

HANSEN: All right. Now wait for it. Here are the CERN rappers with your puzzle prizes.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Unidentified Woman (Member, CERN Rappers): For playing the puzzle, today you win some WEEKEND EDITION bling.

FOSTER (Member, CERN Rappers): A lapel pin.

Unidentified Woman: The 11th edition of "Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus." Take it Foster.

FOSTER: Important both they know it. You ain't no rebel got your Deluxe Edition of a game they call "Scrabble."

Unidentified Woman: We call it "Scrabble" too.

FOSTER: Ha, great. Will Shortz Presents KenKen 1, 2 and 3" from St. Martin's Press. Welcome Will Shortie, "Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges" from Chronicle Books to impress all you...

Unidentified Woman: Oh, hey.

FOSTER: ...friends.

Unidentified Woman: The Puzzle master Presents from Random House and Volume 2.

FOSTER: Are we through?

Unidentified Woman: Yeah.

FOSTER: All right, then we're out.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: Oh, wow. Elaine, what'd you think?

Ms. CHAPIN: Oh, it was exciting.

HANSEN: Yeah. And, Will, they should know, it's not Will Shortie. It's Will Shortzie, right?

SHORTZ: They had to get the rhyme there. Yeah.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: Yeah. All right. Well, before we let you go Elaine, tell us what member station you listen to.

ELAINE: WRVO in Oswego, New York.

HANSEN: All right. Elaine Keppen of Geneva, New York, thanks so much for playing the Puzzles with us. You were fantastic.

(Soundbite of laughter)

ELAINE: Thank you.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: All right. And, Will, what do you have to put in our heads for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, a straightforward puzzle. Name a well-known university, move the last letter three places earlier in the name, the result will be a phrase meaning represent. What's the university and what's the phrase? So, again, a well-known university, move the last letter three places earlier in the name, the result will be a phrase meaning represent. What's the university and what's the phrase?

HANSEN: When you have the answer, go to our Web site npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Only one entry per person, please. Our deadline this week is Thursday 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. We'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play puzzle on the air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and Weekend Edition's puzzle master Will Shortz. Thanks a lot, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Liane.

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