FBI Probes Seattle Link To Somali Suicide Bombing According to a Somali-language Web site, the FBI is investigating whether a young Somali-American man from Seattle took part in a recent suicide bombing in Mogadishu. The Web site says the man drove one of the two car bombs that killed 21 people on an African Union peacekeepers base.
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FBI Probes Seattle Link To Somali Suicide Bombing

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FBI Probes Seattle Link To Somali Suicide Bombing

FBI Probes Seattle Link To Somali Suicide Bombing

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

The FBI is investigating whether a young Somali-American man from Seattle took part in a recent suicide bombing in Mogadishu. The claim comes from a Somali-language Web site. It says the man drove one of the two car bombs that killed 21 people on an African Union peacekeeping base.

NPR's Martin Kaste has reaction from Seattle's Somali community.

(Soundbite of dog barking)

MARTIN KASTE: Most Somali refugees arrived here in the 1990s, settling in the lower-income neighborhoods of south Seattle. The community has grown; some estimate it's now up to 30,000.

Here on Rainier Avenue, next to an open-air car wash and detailer, is the spartan office of Somali Community Services of Seattle. The director, Sarah Farah, says as far as she's concerned, the tale of the Seattle suicide bomber is still just a rumor.

Ms. SARAH FARAH (Director, Somali Community Services of Seattle): We don't know if - is this true or not, or what happened to that kid, or what happened to that family. The family didn't come forward still to us at the community center and say, this is what happened to my son.

KASTE: There has been an uncorroborated report from a Somali-American blogger who claims to know the name of the suicide bomber. He says the young man's family has already received a visit from the FBI, which plans to compare the family's DNA to the bomber's remains. FBI special agent Fred Gutt won't confirm or deny that report, but he says a Somali-American suicide bomber from Seattle would fit a larger pattern.

Mr. FRED GUTT (Special Agent, FBI): We've seen reports of this before and some confirmation of it. So it's something we have seen in the past and continues to be a concern.

KASTE: More than two dozen Somali men have disappeared from Minneapolis and other American cities in recent years — and some have turned up in the middle of the violence back home. Earlier this year, Abdifatah Yusuf Isse, a Somali-American from Seattle, pleaded guilty in Minnesota to charges relating to a recruitment effort by a Somali radical Islamist group called Al-Shabaab.

Ms. FATIMA MUSSE (Grocery and Cafe Owner, Seattle): I think you guys crazy; that's not true.

KASTE: The FBI may see a pattern, but Fatima Musse does not. She's a pillar of the Somali community in Seattle. A dozen years after arriving in America, she has her own grocery store and cafe.

Ms. MUSSE: We sell beef. We sell everything to - kosher.

KASTE: Halal.

Ms. MUSSE: Halal, yeah. Everything.

KASTE: She sits in the doorway of her store, a Koran on her lap, and keeps her teenage nephews in line. Musse refuses to accept that any Somali-American kid would willingly go back there. She says parents sometimes threaten to send kids home as a form of discipline.

Ms. MUSSE: When they see this, they say, I'm going to take you back. They say, what did I do? They're scared.

KASTE: Still, Musse says older people like herself are still very much attached to Somalia - not to mention the politics of the intractable civil war there. When told of the African Union troops who died in the suicide bombing that's been linked to Seattle, Musse made a face. The African Union troops have no business being in Somalia, she said. It's not their country.

Martin Kaste, NPR News, Seattle.

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