Bombing Moon Gives New Meaning To Lunatics In response to NASA putting a spent rocket part on a collision course with the moon in search of water, commentator Andrei Codrescu asks whom the moon belong to anyway. They used to call the mentally ill lunatics, but Codrescu says he now wonders who the real lunatics are.
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Bombing Moon Gives New Meaning To Lunatics

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Bombing Moon Gives New Meaning To Lunatics

Bombing Moon Gives New Meaning To Lunatics

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

Not everyone is excited about NASA's mission and count our commentator Andrei Codrescu among the distraught. To him, what NASA crashed into the moon is just one more humiliation for our heavenly neighbor, one more in a long line of indignities.

ANDREI CODRESCU: So, how much does a metaphor weigh? A lot more than NASA thinks. The first man on the moon wasn't an American or a Russian, it was the man in the moon, we all saw when we were kids and somebody older showed him to us. That's the first man on the moon, her permanent resident, and now he's got a NASA rocket at his backside.

BLOCK: Block: That's our contrarian and lunar lover Andrei Codrescu. He publishes the online journal Corpse.org

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