Populace Votes Online for New Seven Wonders Swiss adventurer Bernard Weber decided it was time to update the list of the Seven Wonders of the World that was first created by the Greeks. He wanted to give a chance to wonders such as the Inca ruins at Machu Picchu and the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia.
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Populace Votes Online for New Seven Wonders

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Populace Votes Online for New Seven Wonders

Populace Votes Online for New Seven Wonders

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JOHN YDSTIE, host:

Good morning. I'm John Ydstie.

Just hours left to cast your vote online for the new Seven Wonders of the World. Swiss adventurer Bernard Weber decided it was time to update the list first created by the Greeks 2,500 years ago. He wanted to give a chance to some of the wonders unknown to them like the Inca ruins at Machu Picchu and the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia.

Ninety million votes have been cast so far. The winners will be announced tomorrow.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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