Ohio Changes Executions After Botched Attempt After a botched execution in September, Ohio officials announced late Friday that they will change how they administer lethal injections. The state had stopped executions after prison officials failed to kill an inmate while administering a cocktail of chemicals. Karen Kasler reports from Ohio Public Radio.
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Ohio Changes Executions After Botched Attempt

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Ohio Changes Executions After Botched Attempt

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Ohio Changes Executions After Botched Attempt

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Two months after a botched execution attempt, Ohio has decided to change the way it will put condemned inmates to death.

From Ohio Public Radio, Karen Kasler reports.

KAREN KASLER: Ohio considered changing its lethal injection procedure after a man who was supposed to die in September survived the execution attempt. Romell Broom had been stuck with a needle more than 18 times over two hours, as the execution team tried to find a usable vein. Ohio delayed its next two executions.

And now, prisons director Terry Collins says Ohio will become the first state to use just one powerful sedative instead of a multidrug cocktail and to allow the drug to be injected into a large muscle if a good vein can't be found.

Mr. TERRY COLLINS (Director, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction): Theres no other state that uses a one-drug protocol, nor is there another state that uses an intramuscular protocol. Im confident that the use of the one-drug protocol will legally do the obligation that were required to in the state.

KASLER: State medical advisers say the single drug should cause death in about 15 minutes, as the three-drug cocktail does now. And if its shot into a muscle, it could take up to twice as long to work, but the inmate shouldnt feel pain. This one-drug approach is often used by veterinarians when euthanizing pets, but has never been tried on humans.

Jeff Gamso with the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio says he suspects a lack of confidence in the execution team, and he doesnt think this solves that problem.

Mr. JEFFREY GAMSO (Legal Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio): Were talking about doing something thats brand new, that nobodys done, that has never been vetted and doing it by people who have, frankly, never demonstrated a particular skill at doing even the more ordinary task.

KASLER: And Gamso says there seems to be a rush to put a new method in place in time for Ohios next scheduled execution on December 8th.

For NPR News, Im Karen Kasler in Columbus.

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