Solving This One Will Be A Fine Trick Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase that has the letters N-E-T consecutively inside. Specifically, the letters N-E will end the first word, and T will start the second. For example, if the clue is "cause of a breakdown on the road," the answer would be "engine trouble."
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Solving This One Will Be A Fine Trick

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Solving This One Will Be A Fine Trick

Solving This One Will Be A Fine Trick

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JACKI LYDEN, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden in for Liane Hansen.

And joining us now is puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Jacki.

LYDEN: How come you're on the phone?

SHORTZ: I'm in Baltimore for the North American Teams Table Tennis Championships.

LYDEN: You're a guy of so many talents, Will Shortz.

SHORTZ: Well, I say I have two talents: puzzles and table tennis.

LYDEN: Very good. All right. Now, I understand you have a couple of corrections from last week.

SHORTZ: Yes. Remember I had that puzzle with blobs about my trip to Turkey? And I said that Antalya was the third-largest city in Turkey. I conflated two facts. We visited Izmir earlier on the trip - and that's actually the third-largest city in Turkey.

And then there was actually a mistake about my own game, table tennis. I said that a score of 15-13 was impossible. Actually, that's not right. The modern game is to 11, but if it's tied at 10, then you go to 12, and if it's tied at 11 you go to 13 and so on. So it is possible to have a score of 15 to 13.

LYDEN: Okay. Please remind us of the challenge you gave last week, would you?

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Ben Bass of Chicago. I said think of a word containing the consecutive letters O-K, remove the O-K and you'll get a new word that's a synonym of the first word. What words are these?

LYDEN: And what's the answer?

SHORTZ: Well, our intended answer was jokester to jester. There was an interesting alternative answer: look to lo, L-O. Those are both exclamations. So both answers were counted as correct.

LYDEN: Well, you stumped a lot of people this week, Will. We only received 900 entries. And from the correct entries our randomly selected winner is David Miller from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Hi there, David.

Mr. DAVID MILLER: Hi, Jacki. And hi, Will.

LYDEN: Welcome to the show.

Mr. MILLER: Thank you.

LYDEN: How long did it take you to solve the puzzle?

Mr. MILLER: The look and lo came very quickly. And with all these puzzles I usually talk them over with my mother, and we managed to come up with the other one in just a few other minutes.

LYDEN: And how long have you been playing the puzzle, David?

Mr. MILLER: Oh, I've been listening and actively working on it since Susan Stamberg days.

LYDEN: Well, sounds like ample practice, wouldn't you say, Will?

SHORTZ: Yes.

LYDEN: Why don't you two play?

SHORTZ: Jacki, you have to play too.

LYDEN: All right.

SHORTZ: And David. Every answer today is a familiar two-word phrase that has the letters N-E-T consecutively inside. And specifically the letters N-E will end the first word and T will start the second. For example, if I gave you the clue: cause of a breakdown on the road, you would say engine trouble.

Mr. MILLER: Okay.

SHORTZ: All right. Number one is a person with a crystal ball.

Mr. MILLER: Fortune teller?

SHORTZ: Fortune teller is right. Number two: what M stands for in Roman numerals.

Mr. MILLER: One thousand.

SHORTZ: One thousand is it. Plant with cones. What has cones?

Mr. MILLER: Let's see. Pine tree?

SHORTZ: Pine tree is it. Very good. Kind of party that might be held in Napa.

Mr. MILLER: Wine tasting?

SHORTZ: Wine tasting. Good. A purchase from American or Delta.

Mr. MILLER: Airline ticket?

SHORTZ: Airline ticket.

LYDEN: Oh, excellent.

SHORTZ: Airplane ticket. Good. It's located between an incisor and a premolar.

Mr. MILLER: Let's see. Tooth. Let's see.

SHORTZ: What kind of tooth? And that first word is a synonym for dog.

Mr. MILLER: Canine tooth.

SHORTZ: Canine tooth. Good. Product with the slogan: Where the rubber meets the road.

Mr. MILLER: Is that Firestone Tires?

SHORTZ: Firestone Tires. Good.

LYDEN: Wow.

SHORTZ: What's filled up in a fill-up?

Mr. MILLER: That would be a gasoline tank.

SHORTZ: Gasoline tank. Very good. When you call someone and miss them, they call back and they miss you, you call back and miss them again, et cetera.

Mr. MILLER: Telephone tag.

SHORTZ: Telephone tag is it. What the Ten Commandments were written on.

Mr. MILLER: Stone tablets.

SHORTZ: Good. Steel-cutting tool that has a flame.

Mr. MILLER: A setaline torch.

SHORTZ: Oh, good job.

LYDEN: Oh, my goodness.

SHORTZ: Activity of the National Weather Service along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.

Mr. MILLER: Hurricane�

SHORTZ: Yes.

LYDEN: Tracking?

SHORTZ: Tracking. Yes, good. Last day before the summer solstice.

Mr. MILLER: June�

SHORTZ: Yes.

Mr. MILLER: �20th.

SHORTZ: June 20th is it.

LYDEN: Oh, goodness.

SHORTZ: What Sacagawea was a member of.

Mr. MILLER: Let's see.

LYDEN: Give him a hint there, Will.

SHORTZ: The T is tribe, so you have to know what tribe Sacagawea was a member of. Sounds like I've stumped you both. It's Shoshoni Tribe.

Mr. MILLER: Shoshoni, that's it.

LYDEN: Oh, okay.

SHORTZ: And here's your last one: tiny adjustments to make something perfect.

Mr. MILLER: Fine tuning?

SHORTZ: Fine tuning. Nice job, David.

LYDEN: Impressive, David.

Mr. MILLER: Thank you.

LYDEN: Well, David, as you might've heard, one of our very dear friends here at NPR recently, to our surprise, announced his retirement as a newscaster. For 30 years he's anchored the news during MORNING EDITION. Now he's decided it's time to sleep in and focus on his side gig as a judge and scorekeeper for WAIT WAIT�DON'T TELL ME!

And as a special treat for you, David, he's going to tell you what you'll take home for playing our puzzle today. So here's the voice we all know and adore, Carl Kasell.

CARL KASELL: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, the 11th Edition of "Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus," the "Scrabble Deluxe Edition" from Parker Brothers, "The Puzzlemaster Presents" from Random House, Volume 2, Will Shortz's latest book series, "Will Shortz Presents KenKen" Volumes 1, 2 and 3 from St. Martin's Press, one of Will Shortz's "Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges" from Chronicle Books and a new CD compilation of NPR's Sunday Puzzles.

LYDEN: David, before let we you go, tell us what member station you listen to.

Mr. MILLER: I listen to KNOW FM.

LYDEN: David Miller from Minneapolis, Minnesota, thanks for playing the puzzle with us.

Mr. MILLER: Thank you very much.

LYDEN: And, Will, what's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. Think of three six-letter words starting with B as in boy, G as in girl and F as in friend. The last five letters of the words are the same and in the same order, yet none of the words rhymes with either of the others. What words are these?

So, again, three six-letter words starting with B as in boy, G as in girl, F as in friend. The last five letters are the same and the same order, yet none of the words rhymes with any of the others. What words are these?

LYDEN: And when you have the answer, go to our Web site NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Only one entry per person, please. Our deadline this week is Thursday at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. We'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play puzzle on the air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Will, it's been great fun as usual. Thanks so very much.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Jacki.

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