Editorial Note On Profile Of Veteran's Mother Editor's Note: Since this story was published, NPR has learned additional information about Nellie Bagley: that she has a criminal record. According to the Union Leader newspaper in Manchester, N.H., Bagley has been convicted twice: once for stealing money from a store where she worked, and most recently 12 years ago for taking money from co-workers by deceiving them that her daughter was ill and saying she needed the money to pay for medical bills. NPR regrets the omission.
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Editorial Note On Profile Of Veteran's Mother

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Editorial Note On Profile Of Veteran's Mother

Editorial Note On Profile Of Veteran's Mother

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Now, an editorial note on a story we brought you yesterday. We profiled Nellie Bagley and how she's caring for her son, Jose Pequeno. He was critically injured in Iraq three years ago. We reported on Bagley's battle against the government for more benefits and resources to care for him at home. What the story didn't say, and what NPR didn't know at the time, is that Nellie Bagley has a criminal record.

According to the Union Leader newspaper in Manchester, New Hampshire, Bagley has been convicted twice, once for stealing money from a store where she worked, and more recently, 12 years ago, she served time in prison after fraudulently taking nearly $2,000 from co-workers by falsely saying her daughter was ill with cancer and she needed the money to pay for medical bills.

NPR regrets the omission.

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