Your Letters: Bone Marrow, GOP On Social Media Host Liane Hansen looks inside the Weekend Edition mailbox and reads a few letters from our listeners.
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Your Letters: Bone Marrow, GOP On Social Media

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Your Letters: Bone Marrow, GOP On Social Media

Your Letters: Bone Marrow, GOP On Social Media

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Now, to your letters.

Last week, we heard the story of 4-year-old Maya Chamberlin. She's suffering from a rare blood disease and needs a bone marrow transplant. Finding a perfect match is difficult because Maya is of mixed race. After our broadcast, thousands of people visited the Web site of the National Bone Marrow Donor Program. The organization told us more than 2,500 people have registered since the story aired.

On our Web site, Jean Frederick(ph), a bone marrow donor, shared her experience. Registering was absolutely painless. A cotton swab to the cheek, and when I finally got the call to donate, I was under anesthesia during the procedure - piece of cake. I was a match for someone with a blood disorder. She was of a completely different ethnic background and lives in another country. Without this registry, her doctors would not have found me.

Many of you also commented on our segment about the new ways the Republican Party is reaching out to voters through social media. The GOP has taken to Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to get its message out to the public.

Marianne Moore(ph) of Louisiana is skeptical about the party's efforts. She writes on NPR.org: I hope that this move to other social media means that the Republicans might actually listen to other viewpoints. But I am not hopeful. I already receive emails from Senator David Vitter, which do not speak to my concerns or beliefs at all. They're just speeches in email format.

We want to hear from you. Send us an email by going to NPR.org and clicking on the Contact Us link, or join the discussion in the comments section of each story. You can also find us at Facebook.com/NPRWeekend and Twitter.com/NPRWeekend. And if you want to, send a tweet to me. I'm at NPRLiane, spelled L-I-A-N-E.

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