Facebook Blocks Web 2.0 Suicide Machine A Netherlands-based computer group has designed a program that helps people quickly sever all their connections to services like Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter. The site, Web 2.0 Suicide Machine, doesn't just erase your account, it deletes all your friends and messages. Then it changes your user-name and password so you can't get back in. It also changes your profile picture to a noose. Facebook says the group is violating its policy.
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Facebook Blocks Web 2.0 Suicide Machine

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Facebook Blocks Web 2.0 Suicide Machine

Facebook Blocks Web 2.0 Suicide Machine

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Now if you are motivated to stop social networking, pay attention to our last word in business today: antisocial media. A Netherlands-based computer group has designed a program that helps people to quickly sever all connections to services like Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and LinkedIn. It's called Web 2.0 Suicide Machine.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

Something's so appealing about that. It doesn't just erase your account. It deletes all your friends and messages. Then it changes your username and password so you can't ever log in again. It also changes your profile picture to a noose...

(Soundbite of laughter)

BRAND: (unintelligible) Facebook, though, is fighting back. It says the Dutch group is violating its policy.

INSKEEP: It's policy that encourages more friendliness, I guess.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

BRAND: And I'm Madeleine Brand.

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