Your Letters: Digital TV; Ozzy Osbourne We heard from many of you about last Saturday's story on the numbers of Americans who are canceling their cable subscriptions and opting for the free, digital TV alternative. Host Scott Simon reads responses from our listeners.
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Your Letters: Digital TV; Ozzy Osbourne

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Your Letters: Digital TV; Ozzy Osbourne

Your Letters: Digital TV; Ozzy Osbourne

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters.

We heard from many of you about last Saturday's story on the numbers of Americans who are canceling their cable subscriptions and opting for the free, digital TV alternative.

John Pavlika(ph) of Toledo writes: Cable TV must start to offer � la carte packages or theyll be out of business faster than newspapers and video stores. All I want is two. That's right, two HD channels, and I have to subscribe to three layers of packages. Those days are over.

James Warerick(ph) of Mansfield, Ohio, says that digital TV signals are quote, all fine and dandy but where I live, we get about three channels of a broadcast. If there's a storm, we're out of luck. For us, it literally is cable or nothing.

Nothing is what Patrick Deggan(ph) chose. He writes on our Web site: We cut the cord four years ago, when our kids were 11 and 9. They read more. They spent more time with us at the dinner table. We allow them to watch shows on the PC, but the mindless channel surfing and repetitive show viewing has ended. I do not think I will ever become a cable customer again. I've gotten my life back and will live it to the fullest.

Lots of reaction online to my essay last Saturday about the sartorial choices of some of our nation's top elected officials. Many of the male politicians at last week's bipartisan White House Health-Care Summit wore powder-blue neckties. I wondered why.

Sandy Dumont is an image consultant in Norfolk, Virginia. She writes on NPR.org: Just because a president wears a particular garment doesnt mean its a good thing to emulate. When you have the power, you can break all the rules. Men, please give up the baby blue tie. Blue is trust, that's why policemen wear navy blue. They dont wear baby blue, however, because the darker the color, the higher the authority. Baby blue is for putting babies to sleep.

Finally, few letters about our interview last Saturday with the Prince of Darkness, Ozzy Osbourne. Ken Cattrell(ph) of La Pine, Oregon, writes: Thank you for that fascinating interview with Ozzy. One request though, could you provide an Ozzy-to-English transcript, so I could figure out just what he said in that segment.

SIMON: He played Black Sabbath's Iron Man album. When I started to sing along, his jaw dropped in amazement. I told him that the album was one of the first that I purchased when I was in high school. Well, I'm sure he meant to shock me with the music. He instead discovered maybe Dad was cool after all.

(Soundbite of song, "Iron Man")

SIMON: He played Black Sabbath's Iron Man album. When I started to sing along his jaw dropped in amazement. I told him, the album was one of the first that I purchased when I was in high school. Well, I'm sure he meant to shock me with the music. He instead discovered maybe dad was cool after all. He sure is.

We like hearing from you. Send us your thoughts. You can go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us. You can also reach us on Facebook, Facebook.com/nprweekend, and on Twitter at nprweekend, all one word. And on Twitter, I'm nprscottsimon, all one word.

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