Israel Works To Mend U.S. Ties Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has offered some new confidence-building measures to the Palestinians in hopes of spurring the resumption of peace talks and ending a diplomatic flap with the U.S. Israeli media reports say it includes the release of some Palestinian prisoners and the removal of some checkpoints in the occupied West Bank.
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Israel Works To Mend U.S. Ties

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Israel Works To Mend U.S. Ties

Israel Works To Mend U.S. Ties

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

I'm Melissa Block.

H: NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Jerusalem.

LOURDES GARCIA: While the exact details of the offer aren't being publicized, after the meeting in Moscow, Secretary of state Clinton said U.S. envoy George Mitchell will be returning to the region this weekend to push for indirect talks brokered by the U.S.

HILLARY CLINTON: What I heard from the prime minister in response to the request we made was useful and productive, and we are continuing our discussions with him and his government.

GARCIA: In her statements today, Secretary Clinton said the bond between the two countries remains in place.

CLINTON: Our relationship is ongoing, it is deep and broad. It is, you know, strong and enduring.

GARCIA: Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, NPR News, Jerusalem.

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