Coming To A Screen Near You: A 3-D Clash In the wake of the blockbuster success of Avatar, Hollywood studios are rushing to release more movies in 3-D. The problem: There are only a limited number of studios with 3-D technology, leading to a traffic jam of sorts that's coming in the next few weeks.
NPR logo

Coming To A Screen Near You: A 3-D Clash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/125086877/125086852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Coming To A Screen Near You: A 3-D Clash

Coming To A Screen Near You: A 3-D Clash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/125086877/125086852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Good morning, Kim.

KIM MASTERS: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Explain to us what's going on here. And when I say traffic jam, I mean there are not enough theaters and there's an awfully lot of movies.

MASTERS: So along comes "How to Train Your Dragon" this Friday, Warner Brothers coming in with "Clash of the Titans." And there's still "Alice in Wonderland," and even "Avatar" is still playing on some 3-D screens. So there is a traffic jam.

MONTAGNE: Does the audience really, though, care if these movies are in 3-D? Would they be going to "Alice in Wonderland" anyway?

MASTERS: So he is now being victimized, as there's a war going on over who is going to get which screens. Is it going to be "How to Train Your Dragon" if you're a theater owner, or are you going to hold out for "Clash of the Titans"?

MONTAGNE: Well, you know, you mentioned that it changed it after the fact. It converted it to 3-D. It wasn't shot in that.

MASTERS: Right.

MONTAGNE: Do viewers know the difference?

MASTERS: Well, that is a question that's being hotly debated. There are people who feel that transforming something that's shot into 2-D into 3-D is kind of a cheap trick. And one of them, perhaps unsurprisingly, is James Cameron, who made "Avatar." And here he is telling us why he thinks this is a typical Hollywood move.

JAMES CAMERON: Unidentified Man: Right. Flip the switch on. Yeah.

CAMERON: Yeah, throw a switch on 3-D, and that's going to work somehow.

MASTERS: And that's James Cameron, talking to MTV. So, obviously, he doesn't think much of this - although, I will point out that he is doing a version of "Titanic" in 3-D, but I assume he'll do it to his own very high standards.

MONTAGNE: So, Kim, what do you think? Is 3-D in a fad phase still, or is it moving into something that's here to stay?

MASTERS: And, you know, some people - including me - think that this will, in fact, become the standard and it will start coming into the home and you'll be watching at home in 3-D.

MONTAGNE: Kim, thanks very much.

MASTERS: Thank you, Renee.

MONTAGNE: And we'll soon see 3-D coming to the world of handheld games. Yesterday, Nintendo announced its new generation of DS handheld video game consoles would have a display that is 3-D. Something interesting, even for those who don't play handheld games, Nintendo says its new 3DS game will not require those big, geeky glasses.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.