Air France: Large Fliers Can Get Second Seat For Free Air France says most of its larger passengers will be able to book an extra seat for no extra charge. Like many airlines, Air France has insisted that people unable to fit into one of its standard economy seats pay for a second seat. But starting Thursday, the airline says those passengers will normally have the extra costs refunded, unless the aircraft is full.
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Air France: Large Fliers Can Get Second Seat For Free

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Air France: Large Fliers Can Get Second Seat For Free

Air France: Large Fliers Can Get Second Seat For Free

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Eleanor Beardsley reports.

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY: Air France spokesperson Jean-Pierre Lefebvre denied the charges.

JEAN: (Through translator) We aren't making anyone buy a second seat. We are proposing to them to buy one at a cheaper price, and if the flight's not full, we'll reimburse them the ticket. This is in no way discriminatory.

BEARDSLEY: Beatrix DeLumberty(ph) with French obesity defense group Allegro Fortissimo says the real problem for obese passengers is when they don't buy a second seat.

MONTAGNE: You might be take off the plane. You may not be able to board if the decision is taken that you cannot sit in a seat, and it could be dangerous in case of a crash that you cannot get off the seat.

BEARDSLEY: For NPR News, I'm Eleanor Beardsley in Paris.

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