Netanyahu Stays Away From Washington Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has decided not to attend next week's nuclear summit in Washington. Israeli officials say Arab and other Muslim nations are likely to raise Israel's undeclared nuclear arsenal at the conference. But that’s not his only reason for staying away from D.C.
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Netanyahu Stays Away From Washington

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Netanyahu Stays Away From Washington

Netanyahu Stays Away From Washington

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Jerusalem.

LOURDES GARCIA: Some Islamic regimes accuse Israel of hypocrisy. Israel is determined to stop countries like Iran from getting the bomb, they say, while keeping its own suspected arsenal away from international inspections. But some here in Israel say Netanyahu's cancellation has less to do with nuclear politics, and more to do with the ongoing strained relations between Washington and Israel.

BLOCK: He's worried that he's going to face a backlash in the United States against the settlement policies.

GARCIA: Meir Javedanfar is an Israeli political analyst. Last month, Netanyahu visited the U.S. and had a tense meeting with President Obama regarding peace talks with the Palestinians.

BLOCK: He had enough trouble last time he was in America, the dressing down he received in the White House. He just doesn't want to face the questions.

GARCIA: Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, NPR News, Jerusalem.

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