Your Letters: Ariz. Parks; $10 Blogger; Bobby McFerrin Host Liane Hansen reads listeners' letters about the closure of some Arizona state parks, a blogger who gives away $10 a day and last week's interview with vocal artist Bobby McFerrin.
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Your Letters: Ariz. Parks; $10 Blogger; Bobby McFerrin

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Your Letters: Ariz. Parks; $10 Blogger; Bobby McFerrin

Your Letters: Ariz. Parks; $10 Blogger; Bobby McFerrin

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters.

We begin with our story last week from Arizona where five out of their 30 state parks have closed for budgetary reasons.

Daniel Quigley of Franklin, North Carolina, took issue. He writes: When I see stories like this I find hidden political agendas and greed are at play more than the given reason for closing the park. I live in a county in western North Carolina that has 166,000 acres of national forestland, and a few years ago the state tried to sell much of it. Because of local public pressure, the politicians decided it would be political suicide to endorse this. Quigley says he hopes the good people of Arizona will make this a major issue.

Last week, we went to D.C.'s Chinatown neighborhood to meet a man who's been giving away $10 a day to random strangers.

Mr. REED SANDRIDGE: My name is Reed Sandridge.

MOLLY: Um-hum.

Mr. SANDRIDGE: And would love to give you $10 today.

MOLLY: You must have a lot of money to be able to do that.

Mr. SANDRIDGE: What is your name?

MOLLY: It's Molly, M-O-L-L-Y.

HANSEN: Sandridge came up with the idea after he lost his job and needed something to occupy his time. He calls it his year of giving.

But Steve Maj(ph) of Pickering, Ohio writes: It should be called Sandridge's year of getting free publicity as he searches for a job. What is Reed doing by flamboyantly giving away $10 a day to individuals at random? For $3,650, he's getting as much bang for his hey-world-look-at-me buck as I can imagine. It is obvious that Reed Sandridge is the only real beneficiary of his boisterous efforts and the story shouldn't have ignored that fact so perfectly.

We received a number of comments about our interview last week with vocal artist Bobby McFerrin. Brian Forest of Lynchburg, Virginia wrote in. He calls McFerrin one of the greats.

Mr. BRIAN FOREST: Listening to Bobby is pure joy but watching his perform, I find myself sitting wide-eyed, watching everything, trying not to miss any details like a child enthralled by an illusionist's skills. And like that stage magician, Bobby skillfully performs his vocal slight of hand, creating multiple sounds that couldn't possibly have come out of one body simultaneously and yet do with relative ease as he dances and grins, slapping his chest to the rhythm of his own heartbeat. I can't wait to listen to the new album and hope there are many more to come.

Mr. BOBBY MCFERRIN (Vocal Artist): (Singing) Come down off your throne and leave you body alone, somebody must change...

HANSEN: We can't wait to hear from you. Send an email by visiting NPR.org and clicking on the Contact Us link. You can also reach us on Facebook.com/NPRWeekend. And I'm on Twitter - NPRLiane L-I-A-N-E.

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