Your Letters: Supreme Court; Basketball Prodigy Last week host Scott Simon shared some thoughts on the evolving definition of diversity, and how it might be reflected on the U.S. Supreme Court. Last week he also talked with Bruce Weber, men's basketball coach for the University of Illinois, about child athletes being recruited by college programs at younger and younger ages. Simon reads some listeners' reactions.
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Your Letters: Supreme Court; Basketball Prodigy

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Your Letters: Supreme Court; Basketball Prodigy

Your Letters: Supreme Court; Basketball Prodigy

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING AND MUSIC)

SIMON: Last week I shared some thoughts on the evolving definition of diversity and how it might be reflected on the U.S. Supreme Court.

A: Last week, we spoke with Bruce Weber, men's basketball coach at the University of Illinois, about child athletes being recruited by college programs at younger and younger ages.

BRUCE WEBER: These kids are young and they're still kids. And, you know, if you put so much pressure on the young men or young ladies, I think it's going to backfire in the long run.

SIMON: Coach Weber extolled playing basketball for the love of the game. Colleges extol the love of learning. With increased competition, I doubt that the love of either will endure as a youth's main motivation.

SIMON: I was a child prodigy who was advanced to older age groups when I dominated my own, but I know had I not been advanced I would have quit out of boredom. It was the challenge of a goal that excited me and kept me engaged. Without it my interest would've withered. While I agree many children are pushed too hard too young, an opportunity should still be available for those that can thrive on it.

SIMON: Well, we thrive hearing from you. Email us. Go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us. You can also reach us on Twitter. I tweet at NPRScottSimon - all one word. The rest of the weekend staff is at NPRWeekend - all one word.

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