One Family Born From Two When divorcee and single mom Dot Romano married Ronnie Campi, a widower with five kids, she says she wanted to be a mother, not a stepmother. Now people can't tell "where one family starts and the other one ends."
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One Family Born From Two

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One Family Born From Two

One Family Born From Two

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LYNN NEARY, Host:

Dot Romano married Ronnie Campi in the early 1960s. When they met, Dot was divorced and raising a child alone. Ronnie was a widower and father of five. One of his daughters, Kim, recently asked Dot about their blended family.

DOT ROMANO: And several people said to me, you're marrying this guy and he's got five kids? What are you, crazy? And I said, well, I love him so much, I'll learn to love those kids. And then as the marriage progressed, I used to tell him quite often, you know, Ronnie, you're lucky I had these kids 'cause I never would have stayed here without them.

KIM CAMPI: Do you remember when you first met me?

ROMANO: Yes, and I don't know if you'll remember this. But you and David used to call me lady. It was lady, lady. And one of the cutest things was, you used to say to me, you know, lady, my mother had red shoes. Do you remember that?

CAMPI: I do remember that.

ROMANO: And you know, I wish that I could've made my first marriage a success. But when I think about that, I think, gee, all I would have is Mona, and look what I have now.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NEARY: Dot and Kim Campi at StoryCorps in New York City. Their interview will be archived at the Library of Congress.

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