Letters: Facebook, Oil Spill, Star Haircuts Melissa Block and Michele Norris read from listener e-mails about our interview with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and stories on the BP oil spill and Willie Nelson’s haircut.
NPR logo

Letters: Facebook, Oil Spill, Star Haircuts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127244605/127244578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Letters: Facebook, Oil Spill, Star Haircuts

Letters: Facebook, Oil Spill, Star Haircuts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127244605/127244578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

It's time now for your letters, and many of you wrote about my interview yesterday with the founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg. The popular social networking website has been under fire for its increasingly complex privacy settings, and how much personal information is shared unless you actively opt out. Well, this week Facebook announced new, easier-to-use settings. I asked Zuckerberg, why not make privacy the default setting?

Mr. MARK ZUCKERBERG (Founder, Facebook): When people ask, why don't we have the most restrictive settings? I think what they're asking is, why don't we set things to be visible to friends only by default? And the answer to that is that Facebook has always just been about friends and community, so that's why.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Damon Bosetti(ph) of Great Falls, Montana, was not impressed with the answer. He writes: I must say, I was taken aback by Mr. Zuckerberg's astonishingly glib answers to your questions about privacy and involuntary monetizing of personal information. By restating your simple questions in his careful and evasive terms consistent only within the context of Facebook's legal advisers, his condescending answers and tone illustrated to me just what kind of gall his company has. Thank you, ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. As soon as I can, I am jumping ship to another social network.

BLOCK: Our ongoing coverage of the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has drawn a range of responses. Steve Weinberg(ph) of Kirkland, Washington, wishes we would stop focusing on the different estimates of just how massive the spill is. He writes: I have no love for offshore oil drilling, but this is one case where BP and the government are right. At this point, it doesn't matter at all if it is a thousand, 10,000 or 100,000 barrels per day; it is a lot. It is having a horrible impact on the environment, and BP has no reason to minimize what will be obvious as the damage continues. By endlessly focusing on this point, he writes, NPR lowers itself to the scandal-mongering level of Fox News.

NORRIS: Country music star Willie Nelson recently cut his legendary locks. And I talked with Kelley Carter who covers pop culture for ESPN.com about the newly shorn Nelson, as well as other famous haircuts from years past.

Well, several of you wish I had not done that. Laurie Marie Pashota(ph) of Quincy, Massachusetts, writes: This is the kind of fodder that can be safely entrusted to commercial radio stations. Just because there are people in the world who occupy their mind with this kind of nonsense does not mean this deserves a national platform. Well, Ms. Pashota, that is a point that's well-taken.

BLOCK: Whatever you think of what we do, we want to hear from you. Write to us by visiting NPR.org, and clicking on Contact Us.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.