Google Asks For Comments On Microsoft Truck The tech blog Gawker reports a Microsoft truck drove around Google's headquarters in Silicon Valley. The truck belonged to Microsoft's search engine Bing. It appeared to be taking pictures, perhaps for Microsoft's online mapping service. A Google employee photographed the truck, and posted it online so others could comment. One called the truck "the roach coach of search engines."
NPR logo

Google Asks For Comments On Microsoft Truck

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127874301/127874274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Google Asks For Comments On Microsoft Truck

Google Asks For Comments On Microsoft Truck

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127874301/127874274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And we have one more example of chest-beating, between Microsoft and Google. The tech blog, Gawker, reports that a Microsoft truck drove around Google's headquarters in Silicon Valley.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

The truck belonged to Microsoft search engine Bing. It appeared to be taking pictures, perhaps for Microsoft's online mapping service, similar to Google's mapping service.

INSKEEP: A Google employee photographed the Microsoft truck and posted it online so that others could comment.

AMOS: One comment called the Bing truck the roach coach of search engines.

INSKEEP: Another suggested maybe Bing return search results so slowly they thought it would be faster to drive them over to Google to have them processed.

AMOS: Online trash talk is our last word in business today.

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Deborah Amos.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.