High Demand Backlogs iPhone 4 Orders AT&T has stopped taking advance orders for Apple's new iPhone 4. Unexpectedly high demand and technical problems caused the company to suspend orders so it can fulfill the ones it's already received. That means phones that were supposed to ship next week won't be in consumers hands until next month.
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High Demand Backlogs iPhone 4 Orders

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High Demand Backlogs iPhone 4 Orders

High Demand Backlogs iPhone 4 Orders

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Wendy Kaufman has more.

WENDY KAUFMAN: More than 600,000 people have ordered the new iPhone. It's a staggeringly high number, and it caught Apple and AT off guard.

KAUFMAN: Pete Fader, a marketing expert at the Wharton School, says this week's problems are just the latest that AT has had supporting the extremely popular smartphone.

KAUFMAN: It really is inexcusable that they've been so poor at managing this gift that's been handed to them.

KAUFMAN: The gift is the company's exclusive right to provide iPhone service. For its part, Apple acknowledges that many customers were turned away or gave up in frustration. Nonetheless, demand for the new phone remains strong. Fader says that reflects unshakeable product loyalty.

KAUFMAN: These issues don't deter people in the least. It's - OK, I'll just have to keep trying - and that speaks volumes about the success of this product.

KAUFMAN: Wendy Kaufman, NPR News.

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