Annual Reports Show Lawmakers' Personal Finances Members of Congress disclosed their personal finances Wednesday, as they're required to do every year. In 2009, they continued to invest in companies they oversee as members of congressional committees. Also, more than two dozen members held stock in companies involved in the Gulf oil disaster -- including BP and Transocean.
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Annual Reports Show Lawmakers' Personal Finances

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Annual Reports Show Lawmakers' Personal Finances

Annual Reports Show Lawmakers' Personal Finances

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DEBORAH AMOS, Host:

Members of Congress disclosed their personal finances yesterday, as they're required to do each year. And in 2009, lawmakers continued to invest in companies they oversee as members of congressional committees.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

AMOS: Democratic Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts...

AMOS: And Republican Representative Fred Upton of Michigan. Many executive branch officials are banned from making investments that might involve a conflict of interest, but members of Congress face few restrictions.

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