Is It Easier For Some Athletes To Suffer Brain Damage? Doctors revealed recently that Cincinnati Bengals player Chris Henry, who died last December, suffered from a chronic brain injury. If we can find a way to discover which players are more susceptible to permanent damage from head hits on the field, sports would become more tolerable entertainment, says commentator Frank Deford.
NPR logo

Is It Easier For Some Athletes To Suffer Brain Damage?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128339775/128352510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Is It Easier For Some Athletes To Suffer Brain Damage?

Is It Easier For Some Athletes To Suffer Brain Damage?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128339775/128352510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Commentator Frank Deford would like to remind fans now, of the darker side of sports, including soccer and football.

FRANK DEFORD: Football and soccer are well-established as, in the worst sense of the word, head games. They're too popular to be substantially changed. But if we can find a way to discover which players are more susceptible to permanent damage from concussions, it will make both sports more tolerable entertainments.

MONTAGNE: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

And I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.