McDonald's Defends Happy Meal Toys The Center for Science in the Public Interest said it would sue the fast food giant unless it stopped using toys to promote its kids' meals. CEO Jim Skinner says the meals are a fun treat, and that it's appropriate to promote them with free toys.
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McDonald's Defends Happy Meal Toys

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McDonald's Defends Happy Meal Toys

McDonald's Defends Happy Meal Toys

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

NPR's business news starts with the defense of the Happy Meal.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: In April, one county here in California banned toys from fast food meals, saying this kind of marketing for children is unhealthy. Last month, the Center for Science in the Public Interest said it would sue McDonald's unless it stopped using toys to promote its kids' meals.

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