An Armada Of Vessels Work In Gulf Spill Site The site of the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico has been packed with boats and workers trying to stop the spill -- including the Coast Guard Cutter Resolute, which supports helicopters and boats. The leak has been stopped, at least temporarily.
NPR logo

An Armada Of Vessels Work In Gulf Spill Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128556735/128556702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
An Armada Of Vessels Work In Gulf Spill Site

An Armada Of Vessels Work In Gulf Spill Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128556735/128556702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

After nearly three months and millions of gallons of oil spilling into the Gulf, BP has stopped the flow from its leaking well - at least for now. The oil stopped flowing yesterday afternoon when BP closed the final valves on the well, leading to a tight new cap.

LOUISE KELLY: First, we'll hear from NPR's Greg Allen. He's on the Coast Guard cutter Resolute, which is stationed at the spill site 45 miles out in the Gulf.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

GREG ALLEN: We fly out from Plaquemines Parish to the toe of the Louisiana boot on a Coast Guard helicopter. It's not until we're about 15 miles from the well site that we begin to see streamers of weathered oil and sheen. Circling over the site, there are three off-shore rigs and dozens of ships concentrated in a one-mile area.

A W: Two of the rigs are drilling relief wells. The third is handling the ceiling cap that finally is enabling BP to control the well.

(SOUNDBITE OF A HELICOPTER)

ALLEN: Unidentified Man: (Unintelligible)

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO TRANSMISSION)

ALLEN: Coast Guard Lieutenant Patrick Montgomery says its an armada, an unprecedented concentration of ships and smaller boats.

PATRICK MONTGOMERY: In a close vicinity to the wellhead, we have approximately 65 vessels within a six-mile range, and another 45 to 50 that are in a pretty close area from there. Having 65 vessels in a six-mile range is a controlled chaos. It's very dangerous out there. But so far we've been lucky with the great seamanship and the great cooperation between all vessels.

ALLEN: Yesterday's news that BP has closed the sealing cap and finally stopped the flow was greeted by many with elation. BP's Doug Suttles, though, tried to keep his enthusiasm in check.

DOUG SUTTLES: It's a great sight, but it's far from the finish line. It's not the time to celebrate, I don't think.

ALLEN: Greg Allen, NPR News, on the Gulf Coast cutter Resolute.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.