A Grandfather Dedicated To Easing Others' Pain For more than two decades, Bartolo Mosqueda worked at a plumbing supply company that makes pipes. But that was just his day job -- in his community, Mosqueda worked as a healer. His son and granddaughter discuss his life and work.
NPR logo

A Grandfather Dedicated To Easing Others' Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129163475/129171541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A Grandfather Dedicated To Easing Others' Pain

A Grandfather Dedicated To Easing Others' Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129163475/129171541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Time, now, for StoryCorps. Families are interviewing each other for this project. Today, a conversation between Carlos Mosqueda and his daughter Cindy. They talked about his father - her grandfather - Bartolo Mosqueda. During the day, Bartolo worked for a company that made pipes. After clocking out, he returned to his East Los Angeles home for another job, as a traditional healer.

CARLOS MOSQUEDA: My dad was basically a chiropractor, but he didn't have a license. He would come home from work, and in our backyard he had a bench. And he'd have four or five people waiting for him already.

CINDY MOSQUEDA: Yeah, he had his workshop back there.

MOSQUEDA: And my dad never charged for his services. People that played sports would come with a dislocated ankle, shoulder - what have you. They'd come in limping, and they would literally leave walking.

MOSQUEDA: Grandpa made an impact like that, that has lived on. To have seen him do that, to make a kind of difference like that, that's an incredible thing.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: It will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Sign up for the project's podcast at NPR.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This is NPR News.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.