Party Politics Or The Politics Of Partying? Between the backstabbing and the partying, American politics can feel a lot like a college sorority. Commentator P.J. O'Rourke says the challenge is to enjoy the social scene without flunking out of school.
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Party Politics Or The Politics Of Partying?

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Party Politics Or The Politics Of Partying?

Party Politics Or The Politics Of Partying?

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

Well, it's just over a week before the big election, and commentator P.J. O'Rourke, for one, can't wait until it's over.

ROURKE: Politics is a sorority. But life is college. If we get too involved in our sorority, we may have a good time, or we may have hissy fits. But if we don't pay attention to college, we flunk.

LOUISE KELLY: That's commentator P.J. O'Rourke, author of "Don't Vote." You can comment on his essay on the Opinion Page at npr.org.

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