FBI Targets Peace Activists For Alleged Terrorism Support More than a dozen peace activists in the Midwest were subjected to search warrants searching for "evidence relating to activities concerning the material support of terrorism."
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FBI Targets Peace Activists For Alleged Terrorism Support

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FBI Targets Peace Activists For Alleged Terrorism Support

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FBI Targets Peace Activists For Alleged Terrorism Support

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

In the next few weeks, more than a dozen anti-war activists in the Midwest will face a federal grand jury in Chicago - an investigation related to terrorism. The FBI searched the activists' homes last week and confiscated computers, photographs and other materials that the search warrants suggests could be evidence of material support of terrorist organizations. From Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

DAVID SCHAPER: Mr. JOE IOSBAKER (Labor Organizer) When I came down the stairs, there were, I don't know, seven, eight, 10 agents standing on our front porch, and I thought they were Jehovah's Witnesses and I opened the door and they showed me a search warrant.

SCHAPER: Iosbaker, a labor organizer, says the agents came in and started searching the house, every inch of it. Joe's wife, Stephanie Weiner, says as many as 25 agents came through their house that day, searching and removing stuff for 10 hours.

STEPHANIE WEINER: Weiner, a community college teacher, says the agents went through their teenage sons' belongings too - notebooks, posters. They even went through the words and designs on their T-shirts.

WEINER: We were stunned. You know, I think I have to say I've suffered through a trauma.

SCHAPER: Investigators appear to be looking for links between the activists and three overseas groups the government classifies as terrorist organizations. They are the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, and in at least a couple of cases, Hezbollah. Iosbaker and Weiner say they've spoken out against U.S. foreign policy in Latin American and the Middle East, but they deny they've done anything that can be construed as material support for those groups. Weiner calls the searches an attack on a political movement.

WEINER: It was truly to intimidate, to divide, to silence and separate the movement.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

SCHAPER: After the searches, hundreds of anti-war activists protested outside of FBI headquarters in Minneapolis, Chicago, and other cities to denounce what they contend is an effort to squash free speech against U.S. policy. But Chicago FBI spokesman Ross Rice says that's not what's going on here.

ROSS RICE: The FBI investigates allegations of violations of federal criminal law. We do not investigate any person or group because of their political persuasion or beliefs, and we support and defend the right of every citizen to peaceably assemble and protest.

SCHAPER: David Schaper, NPR News, Chicago.

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