An Afternoon In Paris As An Illegal Immigrant Despite expelling hundreds of Roma this summer and passing an immigration bill that critics call "harsh and discriminatory," France remains a beacon to immigrants. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley, an American living in Paris, recently had her own brush with French immigration authorities.
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An Afternoon In Paris As An Illegal Immigrant

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An Afternoon In Paris As An Illegal Immigrant

An Afternoon In Paris As An Illegal Immigrant

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Reporter Eleanor Beardsley, an American living in Paris, recently had a brush with French immigration and sent this essay.

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY: Today, newcomers must learn French and are obliged to sign a contract swearing they'll uphold the values of the French Republic. And immigrants can be required to take instruction in certain topics. For those whose language skills are lacking, the state pays for 280 hours of French lessons - not a bad deal. The one course no one gets out of is a full day learning about French civics. Mine is in November, and this being France, a hot lunch is included.

HANSEN: Reporter Eleanor Beardsley in Paris.

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