Movie Review - 'Morning Glory' - Same Old Story, No New Twists A never-say-die producer (Rachel McAdams) wrangles feuding co-anchors (Diane Keaton and Harrison Ford) as she fights to save a fourth-place morning TV show from cancellation. Critic Kenneth Turan says the premise isn't bad -- but the end product is a different matter.
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'Morning Glory': Same Old Story, No New Twists

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'Morning Glory': Same Old Story, No New Twists

Review

Movies

'Morning Glory': Same Old Story, No New Twists

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

To the movies now, and it's been more than 20 years since "Broadcast News" proved that looking behind the scenes in television news can be amusing. A new film, "Morning Glory" has the same idea.

Kenneth Turan has this review.

KENNETH TURAN: In "Morning Glory," Rachel McAdams gives a performance that makes a movie star. The rest of the film, unfortunately, isn't up to her level.

McAdams plays Becky Fuller, a young woman of endearing energy and liveliness. Nothing, but nothing, gets her down.

Fuller's great passion in life is being a morning news producer, a job that pretty much eats her alive. She catches the eye of a network executive, played by Jeff Goldblum, who's looking for someone to revitalize a struggling morning show called "Daybreak."

(Soundbite of movie, "Morning Glory")

Mr. JEFF GOLDBLUM (Actor): (as Jerry Barnes) So you're a fan of our morning program?

Ms. RACHEL MCADAMS (Actor): (as Becky Fuller) Oh, yeah. I think it has so many interesting and...

Mr. GOLDBLUM: (as Jerry Barnes) Yeah, yeah, we know it's terrible - perpetually in fourth place behind "The Today Show," "Good Morning America" and that thing on CBS, whatever it's called. It's a source of constant humiliation. Last year, in the network's softball league, the CBS team wore hats that said, At Least We're Not "Daybreak."

(Soundbite of laughter)

TURAN: The show's co-host is gamely played by Diane Keaton. She's so up for anything, she'll put on a fat suit to face a sumo wrestler.

(Soundbite of movie, "Morning Glory")

(Soundbite of yelling)

TURAN: To help the show out, Fuller hires legendary newsman Mike Pomeroy.

(Soundbite of movie, "Morning Glory")

Mr. HARRISON FORD (Actor): (as Mike Pomeroy) I've won eight Peabodys, a Pulitzer, 16 Emmys. I was shot through the forearm in Bosnia, pulled Colin Powell from a burning jeep. I laid a cool washcloth on Mother Teresa's forehead during a cholera epidemic.

TURAN: Pomeroy, played with cranky conviction by Harrison Ford, has real contempt for morning news, and is not afraid to show it.

(Soundbite of movie, "Morning Glory")

Ms. MCADAMS: (as Becky Fuller) You're here for the money?

Mr. FORD: (as Mike Pomeroy) That is correct.

TURAN: This clash of cultures is certainly an excellent setup for a comedy, and I was loving this movie - until it stopped being good. Having gotten this far, the film proceeds to stumble and lose its way. It gets bogged down in plot elements that are both formulaic and unbelievable. McAdams' fresh and funny performance is worth the price of admission, but not much else is.

MONTAGNE: The movie is "Morning Glory." Kenneth Turan reviews movies for this morning program and the Los Angeles Times.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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