Bush Defends His Legacy In 'Decision Points' In his new memoir, Decision Points, former President George W. Bush revisits nearly all the controversial decisions of his tenure — and defends them with vigor. Historian H.W. Brands suspects history won't be as easy on Bush as Bush is on himself.
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Bush Defends His Legacy In 'Decision Points'

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Bush Defends His Legacy In 'Decision Points'

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Bush Defends His Legacy In 'Decision Points'

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

This is a voice we used to hear all the time, a voice that's gone silent in the past two years.

P: I hope I'm judged a success. I'm going to be dead, Matt, when they finally figure it out. And I'm comfortable knowing that I gave it my all, that I love America and that I know it's an honor to serve.

BLOCK: We have a review of "Decision Points" now from the presidential historian H.W. Brands.

BLOCK: The war in Afghanistan was necessary to root out al-Qaida and the Taliban and create a free society in central Asia, he says. The war in Iraq turned out to be based on faulty intelligence, but the consequence of the American occupation was a chance for democracy to take root in the Persian Gulf.

W: Damn right. And he still thinks he was right.

BLOCK: If we're really looking at another Great Depression, you can be damn sure I'm going to be Roosevelt, not Hoover.

BLOCK: Bush closes by saying he's comfortable with the fact that history's verdict on his presidency won't come until after he's gone. That's just as well, since history isn't likely to be as easy on him as he is on himself.

BLOCK: Historian H.W. Brands is the author of "Traitor to his Class," about President Franklin Roosevelt.

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