Hope Fades As Recovery Drags On In Haiti As more cholera cases are confirmed in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince, frustration is growing with the slow pace of the recovery from January's earthquake. More than a million people remain in makeshift camps, and most of the rubble still hasn't been cleared.
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Hope Fades As Recovery Drags On In Haiti

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Hope Fades As Recovery Drags On In Haiti

Hope Fades As Recovery Drags On In Haiti

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

NPR's Jason Beaubien has found growing frustration with the slow pace of recovery.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD)

JASON BEAUBIEN: At the Camp Place de la Paix, or Peace Plaza, Micheline Marslin lives in a hut constructed out of lashed-together sticks and a patchwork of tarps.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD)

BEAUBIEN: Unidentified Man: That's her house.

BEAUBIEN: Unidentified Man: (Speaking foreign language)

MICHELINE MARSLIN: (Speaking foreign language)

BEAUBIEN: Unidentified Man: (Speaking foreign language)

MARSLIN: (Speaking foreign language)

BEAUBIEN: Marslin describes where each of her four children sleep. Her shelter is built directly on top of the cement stones of what used to be a public plaza. When it rains, she says the floor floods and they all have to stand up holding their bedding until the water subsides. In September, dozens of shacks in this encampment were knocked down when a strong storm blew through.

MARSLIN: (Speaking foreign language)

BEAUBIEN: Before Hurricane Tomas hit Haiti, the government called on people in camps like this one to go stay with friends or family.

MARSLIN: (Through translator) If I had the option to leave, I would leave. I don't have any option to leave. So, I really am uncomfortable in this situation, but that's the only place I have to stay.

BEAUBIEN: Patrick Camille, with a Haitian human rights group called GARR, says people like Marslin are trapped in these camps.

PATRICK CAMILLE: (Speaking foreign language)

BEAUBIEN: Dr. Ronald LaRoche, the president of the Association of Private Hospitals in Haiti, says it was completely understandable that international medical groups came in to help immediately after the quake. But...

RONALD LAROCHE: These people kept going and kept giving free health care to the Haitian population, which led to the collapse of the whole Haitian health care systems. No doctors, Haitians, have jobs. No nurses could work. No labs, no X-ray, because everything was given free to the Haitian people.

BEAUBIEN: Some Haitian health care professionals got jobs with the international aid groups, but LaRoche says these groups could pack up and leave tomorrow. There also was a health cluster under which medical aid groups regularly meet with Health Ministry officials. But LaRoche says the Haitian government needs to channel this aid in a way that will create a sustainable national health care system for Haiti.

LAROCHE: Jason Beaubien, NPR News.

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