Google Offers Virtual Gallery Tours Google is using its Street View technology to help people see art far away from where they live. The tech giant is creating virtual gallery tours at 17 museums in the U.S. and Europe, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the National Gallery in London and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy.
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Google Offers Virtual Gallery Tours

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Google Offers Virtual Gallery Tours

Google Offers Virtual Gallery Tours

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

As NPR's Richard Gonzales reports, the tours go beyond what museums currently offer online.

RICHARD GONZALES: The Art Project is the brainchild of Google employee Amit Sood, who created the site during time allotted by his employer for personal initiatives. He says the tours are made possible using Google's Street View technology.

AMIT SOOD: We have over a thousand artworks from these 17 museums. Over 400 rooms that have been captured in Street View and over 385 artists.

GONZALES: Video cameras mounted on trolleys recorded 360 degree images of selected galleries. Each of the museums allowed one artwork to be photographed with extremely high resolution gigapixel technology.

SOOD: For example, "The Ambassadors" from the National Gallery; you have "No Woman No Cry" from the Tate, and many more. And you can actually get into details that are not visible to the naked eye using this technology.

GONZALES: Richard Gonzales NPR News.

MONTAGNE: And you can find a link to the museums on our website, npr.org.

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