Three Books Explore The Minds Behind Movie Magic When it comes to Hollywood films, the drama behind the scenes is often juicier than the plots on screen. Author Rebecca Chace suggests three books that will take you inside the most brilliant — and the most disastrous film — projects in Hollywood.
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Three Books Explore The Minds Behind Movie Magic

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Three Books Explore The Minds Behind Movie Magic

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Three Books Explore The Minds Behind Movie Magic

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Author Rebecca Chace loves movies so much that last summer, she adapted one of her novels into a short film. She's also a devoted reader of books about the movies. For those struggling to make it in Hollywood or just want to peak behind the scenes, Chace has these suggestions for our series Three Books.

REBECCA CHACE: "Heaven's Gate" was the perfect storm that ended the era of the untouchable Hollywood director/auteur.

NORRIS: Brilliant and fun, smart and literary, each of these stories maps the hidden terrain of an industry obsessed with itself.

NORRIS: Rebecca Chace is the author of the book "Leaving Rock Harbor." Want to discuss these and other books with NPR listeners? Join our Facebook community. Just search for NPR books and click like.

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