Family Breadwinner Finds Her Place: With The Men In 1974, Dee Dickson was raising her two children by herself in Biloxi, Miss. She set her sights on becoming an electrician at a shipyard. But she soon found out that it wasn't so easy to get hired.
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Family Breadwinner Finds Her Place: With The Men

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Family Breadwinner Finds Her Place: With The Men

Family Breadwinner Finds Her Place: With The Men

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's Friday morning when we hear from StoryCorps, the project traveling the country recording people as they talk about their lives. Today's story comes from Biloxi, Mississippi. In 1974 Dee Dickson had separated from her husband and was raising a family alone. She tried to find work as an electrician at a nearby shipyard, but found it difficult to get hired on the docks.

DEE DICKSON: Now I had to do some things a little differently than they did. You know, I couldn't lift an 80-pound transformer. But I found a way to do the same things they were doing. And it kind of made me better than I probably would've been if I was a guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Dee Dickson in Biloxi, Mississippi. Her interview will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Remember, you can sign up for the StoryCorps podcast at npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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