How A Divorce Helped One Couple Grow Closer When Ron and Pepper Miller fell in love and got married 25 years ago, it didn't work out. They divorced eight years later, but remained friends and figured out what went wrong with their relationship.
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How A Divorce Helped One Couple Grow Closer

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How A Divorce Helped One Couple Grow Closer

How A Divorce Helped One Couple Grow Closer

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

On Fridays we hear from StoryCorps, the oral history project that records Americans talking about their lives. Today, a conversation in Chicago. Ron and Pepper Miller met 25 years ago. They fell in love and got married, but it didn't work out. The pair recently sat down to talk about it.

PEPPER MILLER: I think in our marriage, it was all about you. You were the man, mack daddy. And I got to a point where I didn't want it to be about you, I wanted it to be about me.

RON MILLER: I thought you were spending a lot more time on your friends than you were with our marriage.

MILLER: The divorce was amicable, but we went to the same church and you moved to the other side of the church.

MILLER: I did.

MILLER: I felt like giving you the finger several times. You dated people and I dated other people.

MILLER: But, you know, I missed you.

MILLER: Remember you called me and you had the flu.

MILLER: Oh yeah, yeah.

MILLER: And I came and made you soup. I remember smelling your cologne, you know, after having to tuck you in.

MILLER: Yeah, we started having lunch and I mentioned getting back together. But you said, no. And something happened and...

MILLER: Oh, it was one of my girlfriends had talked to me. She said, you know, Pepper, you are constantly comparing Ron to other people. The problem with this one, the problem with that one is that they are not Ron. So I hung up the phone and I called you, and we started dating and it was good. And I remember I took my dad on a cruise. I opened my suitcase and there was this long letter from you, asking me to marry you. It was very romantic. And that was in August. And then in December we were married, man.

MILLER: Right. Eight years the first time, we were divorced five years, and in December it will be ten years we've been married again.

MILLER: I'm still excited to be with you, snuggle with you and smell that cologne. I mean we still have our bumps, huh?

MILLER: Oh yeah. And we'll always have our bumps, I'm sure. But we've learned that there's nobody that we'd rather be with than each other.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MILLER: I love you.

MILLER: And I love you too.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Ron and Pepper Miller in Chicago. Their story will be archived at the Library of Congress.

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