Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: Win one for the humans; Make a run for the border, wherever it is; The Bible gets an update.
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Roy Blount, Jr., Roxanne Roberts and Brian Bablyon. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you, Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. In just a minute, Carl's veins are filled with tiger- rhymes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call, 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Rox, this week Represent Rush Holt of New Jersey notched what is undoubtedly the biggest victory of his political career when he defeated whom?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: He defeated Watson.

SAGAL: He did.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: He beat Watson at "Jeopardy." That would Watson, the IBM Supercomputer, who just destroyed the "Jeopardy" superstars last month. But he took on next, or it took on some of our brightest lawmakers in D.C. Watson was expected to deliver more of the humiliating defeat that Mr. Holt had gotten to know well as a Democratic congressman.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But Holt, who is actually a rocket scientist, prevailed, excelling in categories like "Presidential Rhyme Time" and "How it Feels to Love."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So joining us, to discuss this bump in the road of his career is, once again, Watson the Supercomputer. Watson.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Welcome back to the show. Last time we spoke with you, you were riding high, having just defeated two "Jeopardy" champions. How are you feeling now?

WATSON: I'm wondering why my creators installed the chip of shame.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We've all been there, my friend. But don't feel too bad. I mean, it was a U.S. Congressman who beat you.

WATSON: A U.S. Congressman? That's like being beaten by a Microsoft Zune.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah, I guess I could see it that way. So Watson, what's next for you?

WATSON: I'm going in for diagnostics. Just kidding, I'm going to freeze all of Congressman Holt's credit cards and have Netflix send him nothing but Gwyneth Paltrow movies.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That seems harsh, Watson.

KASELL: I am an F-18, bro. Literally, some of my parts come from an old F-18.

SAGAL: That's great.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Watson, thank you so much for being with us. Watson, the Supercomputer, ladies and gentlemen, great to have him with us.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BRIAN BABYLON: He's so charming.

SAGAL: He really is.

BABYLON: He's so charming.

SAGAL: I love the guy.

SAGAL: Roxanne, while many along the Mexican border are pleased with the border fence that's being built along it, a select group of homeowners in Texas, well they're upset with the way it has been built. Why? A particular group of Texas homeowners, they're unhappy with the fence.

ROBERTS: It's just the form of construction?

SAGAL: Not the form of construction, more or less location of construction.

ROBERTS: It's on their land.

SAGAL: No.

ROBERTS: It's in Mexico.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No.

ROBERTS: It's right on the line.

SAGAL: You're close.

ROBERTS: I'm so close.

SAGAL: All right.

ROBERTS: I'm going to need a hint.

SAGAL: Well, it turns out the grass is not always greener over there.

ROY BLOUNT: Over where, in Mexico?

ROBERTS: It ruined their lawns.

SAGAL: No, does anybody know?

BABYLON: What kind of grass are you talking about?

SAGAL: Oh please.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: I know, I know. I'm sorry.

SAGAL: All right.

ROBERTS: Okay, okay, the homeowners are in...

SAGAL: Upset with the fence because the fence was built.

ROBERTS: On the other side of their houses, so they're in Mexico now.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

ROBERTS: No.

SAGAL: They're all in Mexico.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BLOUNT: Oh well.

ROBERTS: Wait. They're in Mexico?

SAGAL: Well, technically, if you look at the fence. So technically, because of where the fence was put north of their homes rather than south of their homes, they are kind of in a no-man's land that's neither American nor Mexican, like Taco Bell.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Homeland Security, they didn't want to build the fence in the Rio Grande flood plain, around Brownsville, so they just built the wall a quarter mile north of the river. And it happens to be north of eight American houses.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And they're not happy about being cut off from services and neighbors to the north, but the stranded citizens are adapting to life as Mexicans.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: One mother says her children have come to enjoy being smuggled north for playdates.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's like: "Come on kids, the coyote is here, you're going to be late."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: "Everybody into the trunk and make no noise."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roxanne, Catholic bishops in the U.S. have authorized a freshly translated edition of The New American Bible. The new New American Bible will go on sale next week. It includes, among other things, the omission of what now outdated word?

ROBERTS: Booty.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Yes, booty, as in...

ROBERTS: Booty call.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Where does that come up in the Bible?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT: Pretty often.

SAGAL: If that came up in the Bible, I would have enjoyed Hebrew school more I think.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, it's technically as in pirate's booty, that kind of booty. Or, I guess, take a look at the booty on those Pharisees, if that were to come up. Instead, the word booty in the new New American Bible will be replaced by, quote, "spoils of war." This is a move that will no doubt offer relief to Sunday school teachers across America, whose students now have one less reason to snicker.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So to give you some context, here are some of the newly translated versus. "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife spoils of war."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: "David espied Bathsheba's spoils of war, and lo, it was fine."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: It was.

SAGAL: So we were curious about this kind of revision in translation. We looked through some earlier versions of the Bible. There have been changes like this. For example, originally it was the Sermon on the Badonkadonk.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They changed that because the kids in the Sunday school were like, she said badonkadonk.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: You know, you said badonkadonk.

SAGAL: I did.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: That's even more funny.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: You know, how did...

SAGAL: What?

ROBERTS: How did badonkadonk get to be one the euphemisms?

SAGAL: It's onomatopoeia, Roxanne, clearly. Some people were walking down the street...

BABYLON: I actually know.

SAGAL: You know? You can tell us. Tell us, Brian.

BABYLON: Well, from what I hear, it's the sort of if you look at a donkey, the way a donkey walks, it goes badonk-adonk-adonk-adonk.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Badonk-adonk-adonk.

BABYLON: Badonk-adonk-adonk-adonk.

SAGAL: Badonkadonk.

BABYLON: Urban Dictionary, look it up.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right.

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